Charles Darwin had a theory that was adopted by the science and world at large, known as ”survival of the fittest.” Counting down the clock to Talvisota XII, the biggest annual pro wrestling event of them all in Finland, this theory somehow comes to mind.

I’ve seen FCF champion Juhana Karhula posting all kinds of updates on social media, claiming he is prepping himself with a boatload of cardio to get into match shape in less than two weeks on December 2 in Helsinki, when the bell rings. Well, I’ve got news for Karhula: that gameplan ain’t gonna save you.

main event

While Karhula has youth on his side, I have experience. I’ve been through all the wars imaginable inside of that ring, since 1994. I’ve gone in sick, hurt and tired beyond belief. And guess what? I haven’t just survived… I’ve overcome. That’s just one of the idiosyncrasies that makes ”The Rebel” StarBuck the most successful, celebrated, over-achieving professional wrestler in the Nordic wrestling history. Did you hear that? IN HISTORY.

Karhula claims that FCF Wrestling isn’t big enough for both of us, that one of us has to go. Well, guess what, Karhula? I ain’t going anywhere. And certainly not when you dictate.

You wanted the captain’s hat in FCF? Well, you got it. You manipulated and coerced the roster into believing your agenda. Congratulations for mastering the art of being a snake in the grass. You got your desired spot through subterfuge and mutiny. Sounds like a true, modern, millennial leader to me: a sociopath.

Knee strike

Karhula can expect the most hard-hitting aggression on this side of the Atlantic come December 2 at Talvisota XII (photo: Marko Simonen)

I’ve said what’s had to be said. I’ve brought the rot and festering sore inside of FCF to light. Let the people decide who they want to side with. If they want to side with a boy trying to fit into a man’s shoes – a Machiavelian dreamer hungry for personal glory, no matter the cost – then go ahead: take your side with the reigning FCF titleholder, Juhana ”King Kong” Karhula.

On the other hand, if you want true leadership under a man that represents clarity, straight-talk, concise action and no bullshit, along with a track record that speaks volumes to anyone with a brain in their heads, then you will choose the alpha male talking to you right here and now.

First off, however, I will travel to Moscow this coming Saturday, November 25 to defend my Valhalla Nordic Wrestling Championship title against the challenge of Freddy Machete at Russia’s premiere annual pro wrestling supershow, Resliada 2017. I faced Machete in a Fatal Four-way match at the Moscow City Games this past summer, so I have a good inkling of what I’m up against. It should be a kickass event!

preview_valhala

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Man, I don’t know about you, but I’m literally counting down the days to Talvisota XII on December 2 in Helsinki. This date features the biggest wrestling event of the year in Finland, and speaking about Talvisota (translating to Winter War for all you non-Finns out there), I pioneered this event concept back in 2006 and I’ve seen it grow into the flagship spectacle it is for Finnish pro wrestling. This is something I’m honestly proud of, in retrospect. Talvisota has become a staple on the Finnish landscape. It’s our equivalent of WWE’s Wrestlemania.

I’ve seen a lot happen over the years, with a lot of ups and downs, and a lot of knives aimed at my back the moment I turned around (many incidents of which are excellently chronicled in my standout autobiography, Battleground Vahalla, available as a hard copy or Kindle version). I’ve shared the dressing room with people that have literally despised the ground I walked on, as well as those I hold in high regard as the scarcely few I can deem a ”brother” in this dog-eat-dog business. That’s all fine and dandy, because I must have made one hell of an indelible impact for this to have taken place! Had I been another bland face in the faceless crowd, no one would have cared and no feathers would have ever been ruffled. That said, that kind of life was never for me.

Of all of the personal issues that I’ve met head-on in the ring, of all the vendettas and grudges that have been settled inside the squared circle, I really don’t think any single one of them has been as weighty as the one that I will face at this coming Talvisota XII on December 2nd against a guy called Juhana ”King Kong” Karhula, who also happens to be the FCF champion at this point in time.

FCF Wrestling May 27th 2017, Helsinki, Finland.

Juhana Karhula

Karhula has always been ambitious, but he hasn’t always been realistic. That said, at times he has also been lazy and nonchalant, a big dreamer. At other times, I think he believed his own hype, a hype that he himself concocted to bolster his lack of self-esteem, and counted himself more of a star than he actually was. He most definitely saw himself as a bigger star than his britches were made for, and it took him several years to get himself up to speed. But when he got with the program, as it were, Karhula became very good. That I’ll give him. The Karhula that steps into the ring nowadays is as well-rounded a pro wrestler as it gets, but as a man, well … that’s a another story.

I recall hearing the echoes on the breeze tell me in recent years of how Karhula saw himself as a better trainer than me, of how he saw his skill level being over and beyond that of mine. When I heard this, I chuckled to myself. I thought that here is a young man, full of piss and vinegar and a load of pipe dreams, trying to convince himself that he’s better than the big daddy of the fold. I whimsically passed it off as youthful bravado and over-ambition.

When I ran the FCF ship for a number of years, I let Karhula take the lead of training the new talents that came in the door. He was hungry to show his worth and he felt up to the task, and so this lot was given to him. He obviously took this as a sign of weakness from me, and proceded to run mutiny with the younger members of the Finnish wrestling fold, poisoning their minds over the past years against the old captain of the ship. My style of old school man-up leadership didn’t sit well with many of the ”boys” (intonation: not quite men yet), who would gripe behind my back about shit but never had the balls to come and talk to me about it. Karhula became the in-between and sponge, as it were, for the gripers, and he used that energy as firepower to cook up his own little mutiny. A man with integrity would have told those gripers to man-up and go talk to the boss directly, just as they have to do with Vince McMahon in WWE. When I look back, the only ”reasoning” I can find for his behavior and choices can be summed up as petty jealousy. Sure, even then, Karhula led others by example: his example only was one of subversion, spinelessness and again, mutiny.

The fact is Juhana Karhula was never better than the man that taught him, even though he does everything in his power to avoid mentioning my name when it comes to who trained him up and who mentored him. Simply put, he hated – and still hates – what he could never be.

Oh, on the surface it looks very different, I’m sure. I’m certain that when most folks look at the way Karhula carries himself and the way he makes his case, they’ll be deluded into falling for the mirage of the ”good guy,” or the ”honest guy.” The cold, hard truth is that Karhula is most definitely NOT a ”good guy.”

Even in one of his last blogs, Karhula tried to paint this picture of FCF Wrestling having been a personal ”playground” for me when I ran the ship like a tyrant, as he put it. What he fails to realize and give me credit for is, that I opened numerous doors for not only him, but also a litany of other Finnish talents, when I was at the helm. It was through my personal sacrifices, connections and labors, that everyone got a piece of the pie. I was the baker, the roster were the beneficiaries, sitting at the round table, waiting to be served. Of course Karhula doesn’t want anyone to see this picture, because it completely destroys his argument and attempt to discredit me. And be it said, that every single business and organization needs a clear-cut leader at the top, someone whose word is iron law, so that everyone underneath has a clear direction and concise marching orders, as to what is expected of them to make the co-operative effort work.

The truth is, that the yuppie, liberal, millennial roster simply didn’t like the way StarBuck ran the game, which was LIKE A WRESTLING PROMOTION. After 25 years spent out in the mat game worldwide, you’d think these kids would have had the faith to understand a time-tested pro was at the helm, running things like they had been run for numerous decades in our industry. But no, they wanted a culture club, a little after-school play park where everyone got their wishes granted and everyone was made to feel like a special snowflake. And who better to choose to lead a juvenile lot like that, than one of their own?

karhula and starbuck standoff

Karhula’s a snake in the grass. He’s a young man full of resentment and jealousy. Where he could have gone the extra mile like I did in making his career on a global level, he simply dreamed and talked. He didn’t put in the sacrifice and effort needed, nor did he show the must-have heart and ballsy daring that blind leaps of faith require to make it in any chosen endeavor.

No. Karhula simply rode the coattails of upper management, expecting to be treated like a special charity case or favored child. He thought that his inherent talent warranted him all the blessings that would be passed his way from those in power. Someone else laid down the pavement that he was then able to stroll on. And like a greedy, self-serving child, he just expected more and more. Chalk it up to a false sense of entitlement for a millenial child.

Then, when he saw his opening in late 2015, Karhula realized that now was his time. The Finnish wrestling roster had changed dramatically since the golden days of the early 2010’s in FCF, when under my auspices, we were the ONLY office out of Europe to have a working relationship with a main Japanese wrestling promotion. A lot of the veteran talents from that era had either moved on to live in other countries or had hung it up, moving on in their lives to other endeavors and vocations.

Now, a new stock of upstarts and mid-card hopefuls were filling up the bulk of the roster. The internal climate was right for an overhaul. Youth beckoned unto youth and like called out to like. The pipe dreams of one became the pipe dreams of many. Karhula had his uprising, captaining his grand bastard mutiny, and so he was chosen by the disoriented, disenfranchised younglings that he helped coach up, as their new spiritual leader.

In came the liberal, soft, democratic values of Juhana Karhula. Out went the cold, hard realities of 25 years spent in the global wrestling industry and the conservative leadership of StarBuck.

Well, guess what? On December 2nd in Helsinki, when Talvisota XII takes place, this isn’t just going to be another wrestling match. It’s not some ”storyline” for the fans to amuse themselves by. No. This is going to be a personal war of attrition and I’m going to take deep-rooted pleasure in breaking one Juhana ”King Kong” Karhula into pieces.

I could give a damn whether anyone sides with me that night. Times have changed, and so be it. I’m going into that ring to annihilate and decimate Juhana Karhula. I’m going to strip him of his title belt, I’m going to forcefully eviscerate his false sense of ”honor” and I’m going to make an example of him in front of the entire, youth-infested FCF locker room.

December 2nd will be known as the day that a false leader, captaining his own, personal mutiny against the father of an entire cultural phenomenon in the country of Finland, meets his own, due demise.

die karhula

Well, ladies and gents, it seems that 2017 is turning out to be one of my better years in the wrestling game.

Firstly, my long-awaited autobiography Battleground Vahalla came out through Crowbar Press, and it has since been released on Kindle also!  This book has been selling great, and I am stoked about its success!

Shawn Khan Battleground Valhalla StarBuck

Shawn Khan, the Director of the Middle East and USA for Pro Wrestling Entertainment Pakistan, whom I wrestled for in May of this year, mugs with my autobiography!

Whereas this summer, I became the first-ever Valhalla Nordic Wrestling Champion, a title covering four Nordic countries (Finland, Sweden, Norway and Denmark), I also find myself as the number one contender for the Finnish FCF Wrestling championship title, with a title shot pending and upcoming on December 2 against current FCF titleholder Juhana “King Kong” Karhula at the biggest annual event in Finnish pro wrestling, Talvisota XII.

FCF Haastajalista_17.10

As of late this autumn, I’ve traveled on several occasions to Germany to wrestle, doing very well for myself there against the top European competition, against the likes of Pascal Spalter of Germany and James Mason of England.  Just this past weekend, I toppled Native American superstar and former WWE name Tatanka in Delmenhorst, Germany.

StarBuck vs. James Mason POW Germany

I had one hell of a technical match in Hannover, Germany on October 14 against POW Intercontinental champion James Mason.

On November 11, I will travel to Wittorf, Germany to wrestle a mammoth of a man in Voodoo from the UK at DWA Harley Night XVII, and on November 25, I travel to Moscow, Russia to fight at Wrestliada 2017, which is the biggest Russian pro wrestling event of the year on an annual basis.

DWA Harley Night 2017

In addition, I have some marquee gigs with my band Stoner Kings coming up on November 17 in Helsinki in support of Swedish heavy rock powerhouse Sparzanza at Nosturi’s Alakerta venue and on November 18 in Tallinn, Estonia at Rockstars, where Stoner Kings will be joined by Redneck Rampage from Estonia and Hold from Finland.

Stoner Kings 2017

Stoner Kings are back on the attack, with monsterously potent new music soon coming out! (photo: Marko Simonen)

Right now, I am in the studio with both my Stoner Kings and Crossfyre bands, as we have new music coming out at the end of this year also!

In closing, get this: the It Came From The Desert movie (based on the famous 1989 Amiga video game) that I play a key role in has now been sold worldwide, as far as Japan!  Add to that the fact that Finland’s first-ever superhero action movie Rendel has been scooping up tons of international acclaim and licenses, and I’d feel comfortable saying the snowball of momentum is super-hot right now!

It Came From The Desert JAPAN

Stay tuned, more infos coming soon!

In every man’s life, there comes a time when the wheat is separated from the chaff and a personal agenda is born.  A time when those he has brought up, fathered and mentored turn their backs on him.  A time when he himself sees how he has become the villain in minds of those who abide by the current, liberal undertow of society.

For years upon years, I spearheaded the professional wrestling business in Finland.  As its pioneer, I did everything within my power to take this fine fighting art in this remote nook of the world and make it into something truly remarkable.

I achieved that and much more in my tenure as the heart and soul of Finnish pro wrestling.  Since the inception of FCF Wrestling, Finland’s one and only pro wrestling promotion, in 2006, I worked my ass off to put the company on the European wrestling map.  And I did.

Through my arduous efforts, FCF Wrestling became a hallmark name on the European Wrestling scene in the Y2K era.  I was able to negotiate and work as flourishing deal with both the SMASH and WNC wrestling promotions of Japan at the turn of the 2010s.  We, as FCF Wrestling, were the only foreign promotion in the Land of the Rising Sun to have a working deal with a Japanese office outside of ROH and TNA out of the USA.  We were the only ones out of Europe to enjoy such a lavish standing.  And guess who was the workhorse behind all of that?

WTF

The horse that pulled the cart for everyone for over a decade (photo: Marko Simonen)

With one StarBuck at the helm of FCF, our organization spawned a litany of export talents that would go on to enjoy massive success across Europe, in Asia and in North America.  Talents such as Heimo Ukonselkä, Pasi Suominen, Kristian Kurki, Valentine, Kageman Guro, Stark Adder, Aurora, El Excentrico, Jessica Love, Mikko Maestro, Petrov, plus a certain wrestler named Juhana Karhula, all got their chance to shine abroad under Captain StarBuck’s gutsy and ambitious leadership.

Alas, this brings me to 2017 and the aforementioned individual, Juhana Karhula.  Nowadays, Karhula finds himself at the helm of the FCF ship, as its champion and its head coach.  He’s gotten the locker room to rally behind him and aspire to his vision.  In short, he’s become quite the influence.  An influence that has turned a whole horde of children against their own father, as it were.

Back in 2008, an infamous couple ran FCF Wrestling for a spell as the promoters of the organization on paper.  They hated me.  Absolutely despised me.  They were, for lack of a better term, a cancer in the bones of Finnish pro wrestling.  They were about to smoke me out of FCF altogether in the fall of 2008 and put an 18-year-old Juhana Karhula, who had been wrestling for three years up to that point only in Finland, as head coach and matchmaker.  This plan didn’t pan out at the time, as the locker room got smart to what was happening and this antagonistic couple ended up leaving the organization and passing it on to a new leadership back then, which was outlined in detail in my official autobiography, Battleground Valhalla, out now in print and as a Kindle download through Crowbar Press from the USA.

Kick

Karhula surely has as much attrition for my person as I do for him (photo: Marko Simonen)

Juhana Karhula, then wrestling under a mask as Ibo Ten, was all game for the coup back in 2008 when it was presented to him.  He literally salivated at the prospect of filling some mighty big shoes, replacing the author and founding father of Finnish pro wrestling in a key position.  When things didn’t pan out, the young man fell into a depression as his world fell apart.  For years, he became a shadow of himself, struggling to establish his identity in the annals of pro wrestling and trying to come to grips with the fact that he’d have to learn to live with the fact that old StarBuck wasn’t leaving the helm any time soon.

Time passed and new faces came into the FCF organization, just as the tides of society were changing also.  The societal norms, as it were, were changing.  No longer could you call a spade a spade, and no longer was black black or white white.  It became an age of overt and exaggerated, twisted and insistent political correctness.  It became liberalism up the ass and all manner of inane “tolerance” talk.  It became the day and age of the blind willing to be lead by the blind.  An age when everybody wanted to walk to the beat of the weakest common denominator, so as not to make anybody feel excluded and left out.  In short, it became what we now hold to be modern, social justice warrior infested, virtue-signaling society.

Drilling punches

I’ll break anyone who steps between me and my quest for vengeance (pic: Marko Simonen)

The world and old school, clear-cut approach of StarBuck was no longer relevant.  The new, younger crop of FCF wrestlers wanted a leader that resounded with their values system and liberal views.  They wanted the soft, lily-livered approach.  The one that treated everyone with kid gloves and gave out prizes to everybody, just for showing up, instead of for achievements.

And so the old faithful rock, Captain StarBuck, was rolled aside to let in the new “messiah” of FCF, Juhana Karhula.  What started as a seed sown in 2008 finally came to fruition in 2017, almost a decade later.

Now, it’s war.  It’s damn personal.  Not only have this little rat pack of current Finnish wrestlers chosen their leader, they have also spawned a lethal agenda.  They have let the tempest in.  With a vengeance.

This past weekend, on Saturday night, September 2nd in Helsinki, FCF Wrestling held it’s Wrestling Show Live event at Pressa nightclub.  For the second time since the whole of FCF turned their backs on me, I made a personal statement to the reigning champion and face of FCF, Juhana Karhula.  The first time was back in May of this year, when I cost him his match with Germany’s monsterous Demolition Davies.  This time, I cost him his match against the Beast from Sweden, in only 15-seconds of ill-fated fame.  Afterwards, Karhula lost it and attacked me in the dressing room, which was caught on camera and can be seen on the FCF Wrestling page on Facebook.

Knee strike

A world of hurt is about to rain down on Juhana Karhula and no one can stop what is going to take place (photo: Marko Simonen)

I won’t rest until I’ve done in and done away with Juhana “King Kong” Karhula.  I will haunt him to the ends of the Earth, until I have my vengeance and my personal vendetta is fulfilled.  Watch me.

Every once in awhile, I try to offer the newer guys and gals coming up in the pro wrestling industry something worthwhile, which would help them orchestrate and navigate their careers.

Myself having been in the pro wrestling trade now for a quarter century, I’ve met many successful contemporaries in my travels, who’ve carved out particular niche’s for themselves in the business.  These pros have learned to navigate in the shark-infested waters that make up professional wrestling, and they have valuable life experience, which can be readily used as learning material for the next generation.

In so saying, I offer up a unique angle for this one-on-one interview that I conducted with former WCW alumni Paul Neu, who wrestled for Ted Turner’s World Championship Wrestling in the early ’90s as PN News, and shortly thereafter migrated to Europe, where he became known as Cannonball Grizzly.

The man became one of the most successful journeyman big man wrestlers in the past three decades arguably worldwide, and he took some time out to shed some light on how you have to adapt your in-ring style as you get older and the injuries mount up, as well as advice for other big man-style wrestlers now coming up in the business and how to stay healthy to help prolong one’s career.

Listen up and take to heart what Paul has to say.

Cannonball Grizzly

Cannonball Grizzly stands 188cm and weighs 190kg

1. Thanks for taking the time out to do this one-on-one piece. I’d like to dig into the topic of how, as a veteran, and as the years pile up and the injuries accumulate, you have to adapt your in-ring style and working approach. However, first, how are you doing nowadays that you’ve moved back to your native USA after spending, what, the better part of 25 years wrestling in Europe?

Hello, Michael.  First of all, thank you for the opportunity to express myself on your platform. I’ve enjoyed entertaining fans around the world for over 31 years and its great to address not just fans, but future wrestlers as well.  

Wow, you hit me with an amazing question to start. As an athletic big man, it’s been a hard tradition over the years. I always want to produce, show people I’m athletic. I had to stop drop kicking after 25 years. I’ve done moonsaults, sentons, topes, top rope splashes, etc.  

The splash was hard on my knees so I changed to the senton as my finish. From top rope to a second rope senton when my back started hurting. Basically what you learn over time is how to work the crowd with showmanship instead of overwhelming them with the ooh and aah of brute force and majesty of big moves. I got better heat from working smart than working hard. When you do something big it should mean something.

Tradition is transition.  Moving back to the States has been good for me. I’m picking up legend conventions. I’m not really advertising myself at the moment. I’m getting to know family again and settling down. I needed a pause. My body needs healing if it’s even possible.

2. What made you choose coming to Europe back in the day, after your WCW contract ended, in lieu of going somewhere else or taking a different career path? How did the parting with WCW come about, and would you have liked to continue there?

I had a few opportunities to continue in America. Territories were dying. The WWF/WWE was actually trying to do something with me. Unfortunately, they wanted me to wait around. I couldn’t, my daughter was on the way and I need to make money so I chose to come back to Europe. I don’t regret it.  The business in Europe was pretty good at the time. My love for Austria and Germany at the time made my choice easy.

3. You found a good deal of success in Europe, but you also saw the business change drastically over the quarter-century that you spent here. I recall you once saying in a locker room in Germany back in 2013, that the job used to be 30 dates a month, now it’s 30 dates a year. Why do you believe that the business changed so drastically in Europe also, taking into account that this is not Vince’s predominant playground to begin with?

You can watch wrestling on TV everyday. The market is over-saturated and that isn’t a good thing. Wrestlers are stars but when you’re on TV every week, you’re a SUPERSTAR. It’s hard to compete with television.

4. You’ve been a super-heavyweight all of your career. What are the main things you would give as advice, coming from a big man worker, to the newer crop of big men and super-heavyweights coming up today?

There really aren’t any super-heavyweights anymore. The size of your average wrestler is getting smaller. So it’s hard for big guys now. I’d say to be a super-heavyweight today, athleticism is the key. If you’re big and you’ve never done anything athletic, only sat in front of a computer and a TV your whole life, stay on the other side of the barrier.

Cannonball Grizzly vs Alofa

Battle of the super-heavyweights: Cannonball Grizzly vs. Headshriner Alofa

5. What are the main things you would expound in terms of career longevity in pro wrestling? What are the key factors of longevity to be taken into account and practice, from your experience?

Stay in the gym, don’t do overly stupid stuff. Work smart.

6. What do you believe are the essentials to ”making it” in the pro wrestling business, to becoming a viable player, to making money and to having a decent shot at procuring the most amount of work possible?

Again the gym. Being good on the mic. You have to have a bit of an ego and still try to be humble. Take and ask for advice from guys who have been around. Show respect, and when you get your shot give everything you’ve got. Look after your gear. Don’t just put on kickpads over sneakers. Look and act like a wrestler, not a mark.

7. Everyone goes in hurt, as the saying goes in our trade. Where do you draw the line, however?

I never drew the line. I worked with a dislocated shoulder, torn hamstring, severed tendon, a lung infection and a sowing needle that broke off in my foot. There is always someone ready to take your place. Not everyone is that resilient, I know. Nowadays, I see kids not show up because the have a nosebleed. In the end, it’s your own call.

8. As we age, the body tends to stiffen and acute nervous response is compromised, since reaction time is slightly dulled with age. I have often used Keiji Muto as a good example of changing one’s stylistic approach to suit the changes that come with age, limiting the amount of action output and focusing more on body language and character presence. How did you navigate in-ring as you got older? How did you alter your style to suit your age-brought restrictions, as time went by?

That’s all part of working smart. I changed my style at least three time to adapt to my bones screaming at me. I new time was catching up when I had to stop throwing my dropkick. Before that I stopped doing my top rope splash, because I was hurting my knees. I switched to the senton and now my hip is messed up so I don’t even do that much anymore.

9. What are the approaches and ways you kept yourself physically viable and functional as the years rolled by?

The gym, stretching and ibuprofen. I wasn’t into the pain killer scene. Unfortunately time catches up with us all.

PN News

Paul Neu as PN News in WCW (1991), before Cannonball Grizzly

10. If you could turn back time and some things over again, so as to prolong your long-term health, hindsight being 20/20, what would those things be?

The nature of the beast. I would have probably done everything the same way. I’d might have cut the top rope splash out earlier or never done it.

11. What advice would you give to guys in the business today, based on your own experiences and what you’ve seen in our industry, in terms of protecting their long-term health and quality of physical life?

Don’t drink as much as I did. Listen to your bones. If you’re waking up in pain every morning you’ve waited to long.

12. What are the biggest changes you noted on a personal level, passing from your 20s to your 30s, and from your 30s to your 40s in your wrestling career?

In my early 20s, I was green. I hit my stride from about 26-44. That was my prime. In my 30s, I was physically unstoppable. By my mid-40s,  I started waking up everyday in pain.

13. Where do you stand today with the current popularized in-ring style, as promoted largely by WWE, TNA and NJPW, where the action is largely spot-oriented and arguably more indie-influenced than ever before? What do you foresee in terms of longevity for the guys utilizing and working this current, modern spotty style?

I prefer the old-school story-telling aspect of wrestling. We played off peoples’ emotion. We could suspend peoples’ disbelief.  Now, it’s all about the oohs and aahs.

14. Thanks for taking the time out to do this introspective piece.  In closing, there’s a saying in our industry, that you work a certain style to get over, and then you work a modified version of that style to stay over. This, however, didn’t seem to work too favorably for guys like Mick Foley or Daniel Bryan. Perhaps a case of too little too late? What’s your take on getting over … and then staying over?

Your body can only take so much. The best workers have around four things they have to do every time they go out there and work. If you have to abuse your body every time, you’re gonna be on borrowed time long before your time would normally be up.

 

 

The folks in Finland have the chance to see the Valhalla Nordic Wrestling Championship defended for the first time on Finnish soil, since I cemented my status as the undisputed champion back on July 8, when, as the interim champ, I defeated Sweden’s Timmy Force to eliminate the “interim” part of the equation.

In that tremendous July 8 encounter back in Stockholm, I took Timmy to 30-minutes of pain, blues and agony (although, I have to say the young man kept hanging in there, putting up one hell of a fight), before I put him away with my world-famous jumping spike piledriver.

StarBuck vs Timmy Force VALHALLA Nordic Championship 6

The finish from July 8 in Stockholm (photo: Fredrik Streiffert)

That match was contested under the auspices of STHLM Wrestling, and under their rules, my finisher is banned, due to it’s risky nature.  Nonetheless, the official in charge of the match failed to see me hit my move, and the rest, as they say, is history.

Now, on September 2 in Helsinki at FCF Wrestling‘s Wrestling Show Live! event, the main event features a rematch between young Timmy and myself.  If our all-time classic showdown in Stockholm on July 8 serves as any indicator, this rematch should be off-the-charts!

The place: Pressa nightclub
Eteläinen rautatiekatu 4, 00100 Helsinki

Doors 16:00
Showtime 17:00

Tickets in advance through Tiketti 16,50€/11,50€
Tickets at the door 20€/15€

Starbuck_Timmy-1024x1024

I just got home late last night after wrestling one of the most satisfying, and arguably greatest, matches of my life in Stockholm, Sweden this past Saturday night.  Man, oh man… what a match it was!

Valhalla Nordic Wrestling Championship belt

It’s funny to think, that here at age 44, I am still pulling rabbits out of the proverbial hat, proving that age is just a number and wine really does get better with age.  After all, I’ve lived, breathed, bled and sweat this business we call professional wrestling for damn near a quarter-century already.  A tiger cannot change its stripes and experience just makes you wiser and more cunningly dangerous as the years accumulate.

July 8, 2017 will go down in the annals of professional wrestling history as one of the most significant events in Nordic grappling lore.  It was the night that I stepped into the ring as the interim – and first – Valhalla Nordic Wrestling Champion, to face the challenge of a young man nearly half my age, the current STHLM Wrestling Champion, “Kid Fury” Timmy Force.

StarBuck vs Timmy Force VALHALLA Nordic Championship 2

I remember holding a training camp back in 2014 in Langå, Denmark, attended by over 20 wrestling students from four different countries, and young Timmy Force was one of those students at that time.  He had limited experience, being a raw rookie in our industry, and he wanted to get better and up his personal ante.  I was amazed back then at the natural ability of this kid.  He took to everything like a fish to water, and it would have been easy to believe that he had been wrestling already for at least a year, simply gauging by the skill level that he exhibited even early on then.

StarBuck vs Timmy Force VALHALLA Nordic Championship 3

At the end of the training camp in Langå that summer, the DPW (Danish Pro Wrestling) office that hosted the camp, decided to hold a student show on the final day, to give the boys a chance to prove their wares in front of a VIP/invitation-only audience.  Timmy faced another fellow Swede, who has since come to be known as J.O. Hansen on the Swedish wrestling circuit.  They had one hell of a capable and credible wrestling match on that student show, proving to me, as their coach, that both guys were on the track to pro wrestling stardom, if only they could keep their heads level and their bodies healthy.

StarBuck vs Timmy Force VALHALLA Nordic Championship 1

Timmy Force has risen like a phoenix in the Swedish wrestling scene.  He has garnered high-profile victories over the likes of even New Japan Pro Wrestling star Juice Robinson in the past couple of years, and has gone the distance with much more experienced foes like Matt Sydal (Evan Bourne in WWE).  In short, my prediction back in 2014, that Timmy would become a star in this business, became a prophesy come true.

StarBuck vs Timmy Force VALHALLA Nordic Championship 4

Alas, come July 8, 2017, it is only fitting that Timmy Force would have to face the greatest challenge of his young career.  It was the day that he would have to step into the ring with his former coach, “The Rebel” StarBuck, in front of a red-hot, rabid Stockholm homefront crowd, that wanted so desperately to see Timmy take the ultimate prize, the Valhalla Nordic Wrestling Championship.

StarBuck vs Timmy Force VALHALLA Nordic Championship 5

And so it was, that for a good half-hour, Timmy Force fought, kicked, scratched and clawed at the elusive golden ring, in his spirited attempt to wrestle it away from it’s momentary proprietor, me.

Timmy did everything he could, fought valiantly, showed fire, hit his moves with crisp precision… everything in his power… to claim the ultimate prize waiting at the end of it all.

But it was not to be.

StarBuck vs Timmy Force VALHALLA Nordic Championship 6

When all was said and done, Timmy Force was bloody, battered and beaten, in front of a hometown crowd that was on the verge of a frenzy.

StarBuck’s infamous finisher, the jumping spike piledriver, once again took this old boy to the bank.  It was the move that cemented me in wrestling lore for all time as the first UNDISPUTED Valhalla Nordic Wrestling Champion!

Now, let the challengers line up.  Let them come, one by one.  Let them try to wrest this golden grail or Nordic supremacy away from the old lion!  Let them all come, and let them all fall… and bow… to the KING.

StarBuck vs Timmy Force VALHALLA Nordic Championship 7

(Photos: Fredrik Streiffert)